Lease Land from Landowners for hunting.

Lease Land from Landowners for hunting.
Since moving to Minnesota, hunting has been different for me. When I lived kn Kansas the family had 5,000 acres of land. I could hunt anywhere I wanted. I wasn't really aware of "public land". I did not have to deal with any other hunters. Even though we leased some of the acreage to hunters, I never had to deal with them that much. Hunting on "public land" has presented itself with many challenges. So I have decided to try and go get permission from some of the local landowners. I'm not sure how to approach some of them, so I went to the internet for some advice. I found a great article on 8 tips for gaining lease land. I'm hoping this will help me and maybe you obtain some lease land. 1. Ask the Right Person: Be sure the person you are talking to is the actual land owner. You can get that information from the local court house or from a plat book. 2. Head for the Hills: The further out of town you are, the better your chances. Those closer to town people might get asked hundreds of times about hunting. 3. You don't know if You don't ask: Even though everyone you ask says "Mr. Johnson won't let anybody hunt on his land." You still must take the risk and ask. You might be turned down 20 out of 30 times, but that's 10 more places to hunt then you had before. 4. Help with Predators/Varmints: Many farmers/ranchers are eager to let someone hunt coyotes, coons, squirrels and any other varmints, because they don't want to. It is a good way in, if you offer to take out a few pesky coons or coyotes. 5. Hunt Does: We all like to hunt big bucks, but you may have to take a few does first. Plus, many land owners see does as varmints too. Don't go in asking to kill the monster buck on the property. Offer to harvest a doe the first year, and give them some meat. 6. Look the Part: Do not walk up to the door in old holey rags, or even brand new camo. Approach them as you would want someone to approach you. Remember first impressions are everything. 7. Moderate your Vehicle: You may like to go mudding, but don't show up with a muddy truck. It might make them believe you will go anywhere on their land and tear it up. Don't show up in Mercedes either. Plus, mind the stickers you have on your truck, especially political stickers. 8. Be Gracious: When you do obtain permission, let the land owner know you are gracious. Stay and talk awhile if they want to talk. Have the wife bake some cookies. Give them part of the meat when you harvest an animal. Be respectful. On some leases you may only get to hunt for archery, rifle or muzzleloader. You may only get to hunt for a month. Be flexible, it might just be the ticket to getting to hunt. Don't shoot the biggest buck your first time out. Only you, don't take your friends or anyone else, unless discussed with the landowner. Call, if need be, before hunting. I hope with these few tips I can gain some lease land hunting closer to home for this fall.
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